Tag Archives: container gardening

My Mediterranean inspired container garden

container-gardening-small-garden

I love container gardening because I can create gardens in the smallest of spaces and I can easily change my displays as often as I want. I first posted about my little container garden at the front of my house in May, when I had a really colourful display of spring bulbs in containers around my front door.

Inspired by the planting schemes and container gardens I saw during my holiday in Provence, I decided to try and recreate some of this at home. So, I had a change around and purchased some new plants.

The most prominent plants I saw in Provence were agapanthus, lavender, oleander, pelargonium, cactus, cypress trees, roses and bougainvillea. I’ve used these as inspiration and picked a selection of plants that would remind me of my holiday and also work in my sunny front garden.

red-pelargoniums

Inspired by the simple planter I saw in Mouans-Sartoux these classic red pelargoniums are perfect for my window boxes as they prefer full sun and don’t need a lot of water, making them very easy to maintain. The contrast of the bright red colour lifts the pastels of the plants on the ground below and they will flower into the autumn when I’ll overwinter them. To do this I prune back the flower heads, bring them into my house and leave them on a windowsill. I find this works a lot better than covering them with fleece in my greenhouse, which is what I do with some of my other plants over the winter.

garden-containers

Next to my front door (left to right above) I have agapanthus, echinacea, coreopsis, verbena, phlox and my existing pot of succulents. I also chose a little box tree and clipped it into a tall skinny shape to remind me of the striking tall cypress trees that defined the Provençal landscape.

Agapanthus were everywhere in Provence, in containers, in borders and even in central reservations along the roads. Roger Brook from the no dig gardener blog posted this brilliant guide for growing and propagating agapanthus. Since my pot is small and young I’ll be wrapping it in fleece over winter and storing it in my greenhouse.

I’ve never had any success with echinacea purpurea before but I’m determined to have another go because I love how they look. This is another perennial that likes a lot of sunshine so it’s perfect for my sunny location. The snails seem to enjoy a nibble so I’m having to use organic slug killer to protect them.

flowers-front-garden

Coreopsis rosea – American Dream: this hardy perennial is like a dense matt of tiny little pink daisies with wispy green leaves that the bees and hoverflies love.

wildlife-planting

Alongside the coreopsis this verbena rigida forms a drift of colour and really reminds me of Provence. It too loves full sun and is a half hardy perennial, so it will live wrapped up in my greenhouse over winter too.

There’s tons of phlox varieties out there and I think they’re really underrated. Perhaps more cottage garden than Provence but it still works well with the pinks & purples that remind me so much of my holiday.

plant-pots-on-steps

On the other side of the doorway I chose a simple pot of parsley to have handy for cooking. A pelargonium that I overwintered last year, a cuphea, my existing sempervivum (houseleek), lavender and I already had the pyracantha and the rose.

cuphea-and-pelargonium

pelargoniums  rose

The little evergreen cuphea (below) is outstanding and will continue to flower into the autumn along with the lavender and rose, which provide lovely scent. All these plants are great for wildlife and it’s been wonderful having bees and butterflies right outside my home.

cuphea

I loved mixing my new purchases in with some of my existing container plants and although I really don’t feel I recreated the stunningly chic displays I saw in Provence, my summer display has brought me a lot of pleasure and has reminded me of my holiday. Next year I want to continue the theme but I really want to add an oleander and an olive tree!

As we move further into September the lavender will remain flowering for a few more weeks, as will the pelargoniums and the cuphea but the others will fade. So I’m already starting to think about my autumn/winter planting schemes and which bulbs I’ll choose for my spring display.

Do you enjoy container gardening and have you started thinking about which plants you’ll chose for autumn and winter?

 

A week in Provence – the ‘no gardens’

provence

I’ve just returned from a much needed holiday with Adam in the beautiful Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur in France. As well as enjoying typical Provencal 3 hour lunches I’ve also been admiring a multitude of gardens.

When garden writer Louisa Jones first moved to Provence she was told there were ‘no gardens’ apart from certain famous historic properties but for her first book she visited around 300 gardens and has since written many more books about the beauty of Mediterranean gardening.

french-garden

A while back I wrote about my container garden at the front of my house. I felt that some people in my neighbourhood must think they have ‘no garden’ as they choose to do nothing with their space, whereas some people plant theirs up with lovely displays.

I spotted the same thing in France and I found the most inspiring gardens in the most unassuming places. My favourite being the pavement gardens – or the ‘no gardens’, as I now like to call them.

mouans-sartoux-street

mouans-sartoux-garden-3

mouans-sartoux-village

oleander

mouans-sartoux-front-garden

mouans-sartoux-container-gardening

cat-deterrant

I think the water bottles are used to deter cats. Also handy to give the plants a quick watering.

container-garden

All the photos in this post are taken in the little village of Mouans-Sartoux. From the main road you would not know that in the heart of the village lies these colourful narrow pedestrian streets where the doorsteps, windowsills, walls and pavements are planted with stunning visual effect.

I loved walking through the streets getting ideas for my own garden.

mouans-sartoux-gardening

mouans-sartoux-garden-2

mouans-sartoux-for-sale

table-garden

Arranging pots on a table provides height and shade.

simple-front-door-garden

The wonderfully trained foliage above provides the perfect place for a sit down in the shade.

purple-house

For the colour co-ordinated gardeners out there the purple theme above was less than twee.

provencal-garden

pretty-garden

mouans-sartoux-window

front-door-garden

Even a green foliage garden has huge ‘no-garden’ appeal.

provence-village

street-gardening

I never imagined that plants I perceived to be large garden plants would work so well on the kerbside. Large pots of oleander provide a stunningly colourful display.

oleander-france

mouans-sartoux-palm

Even the simpler options had an appeal that I found most chic.

minimal-garden

mouans-sartoux-pelargonium

mouans-sartoux-container-garden-plants

I love the little bamboo trellis in the pot below.

provence-contaner-garden

All the no-gardens I saw, from the crammed full to the elegantly simple had a style and beauty that I just want to recreate back home.

Have you been to Provence? What do you think of these ‘no-gardens’?

 

Welcome to the jungle – the garden has taken off!

allotment-courgettes-july

Since my last post from the garden in late June/early July things have developed drastically! While I’ve been away on holiday the plants have grown, or should I say over-grown in the remarkable British weather!

allotment-july

Adam was a little worried that the sprinkler system he set up would not work…but it did.

We returned to an abundance of foliage, crops and what I can only describe as a jungle in the pumpkin patch!

tomatoes-growing-in-greenhouse

greenhouse-july

We have lots of crops to harvest and a great big yellow courgette! The first of many.

allotment-harvest

apples-and-pears

broad-bean-harvest
brocolli-july
desert-gooseberries
grapes
green-tomato
peas-and-gooseberries-harvest
redcurrants

The higgledy-piggledy wildlife border is a bit of a mess now the foxgloves have died off. Looking forward to the teasel and echinops coming out though and the persicaria is still looking good.

I’ve got some late summer planting ideas for this border and can’t wait to get started.

persecaria

pink-dahlia

Unfortunately we didn’t have a sprinkler system for the front garden but we took all the containers, including window boxes up the road to the allotment so they would be watered. My pots of dahlias have come out while we were away and look great.

Out front the clematis has suffered, so has the rose and the rosemary plant actually died. Wow it must have been hot!

The day lilies are amazing though and have really spread since last year so they’re providing some lovely colour.

Day-lilies

I’m full of inspiration from our holiday in Provence and decided to take the opportunity to have a bit of an overhaul at the front anyway for my late summer display, by moving some containers around and buying some new plants – there’s nothing like a bit of retail therapy!

flowers-front-garden

How are your gardens doing? Do you have a good harvest this year? Do you have any tips for keeping your gardens in shape while you’re away on holiday?

 

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