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The great autumn garden clean up…

autumn-greenhouse

I love taking photos of my greenhouse from this angle but if you look closely you’ll see that the bed to the front left and indeed the path in front is actually littered with weeds and rubble. There’s also a box of pears and the last apples. Yes, it is the great autumn garden clean up!

I don’t normally like to show photos of my garden in a total mess but in all honesty it’s been very untidy all summer due to ‘shed works’ and only Adam doing the majority of the gardening.

The clean up this autumn has been particularly hard because I’ve been nesting at home getting ready for the new arrival. Nesting has involved everything from clearing cupboards to decorating whole rooms! Then of course the weather has been hit and miss, some weekends are lovely and I manage to get outside to potter and some weekends are dire so I stick to DIY. Of course, when I say ‘I’ it really means Adam too because there’s a lot of things I just don’t have the physical strength to do. So yes, I’ve definitely been clearing cupboards but Adam has been on the DIY duties,  so that means very little time for the garden.

garaden-clear-up

Ah, there’s my lovely heuchera! We really enjoyed ripping the annuals and weeds out of this bed. In the spring and summer it was full of foxgloves, which looked great but did swamp all the other plants, killing all my heathers and the Christmas tree didn’t survive either. I’ll have to watch out for that next year.

allotment-late-spetember

The remnants of the old shed littered the front of the allotment for weeks, as did weeds and general ‘mess’ that I was just unable to shift due to my baby bump.

autumn-clean-up

autumn-pumpkins

pumpkins-and-sweet-peas

pumpkins-patch

Clearing out the courgettes was a real highlight because these beautiful pumpkins appeared underneath the foliage (so did a hanging basket that I’d ‘lost’!)

pumpkins

Last year my attempts with pumpkins failed due to the damp summer, so I went a little overboard with the planting this year hoping that I’d get at least one. All the seedlings fared well and my patch resembled something similar to a jungle. I’m delighted with all the pumpkins now of course.

patty-pan-squash

The squash plants produced some interesting shapes too, a lot of the plants had rotted so we had to pick some of them before I would have liked but they are making the best ever autumn harvest display in my kitchen.

Adam brought the little orange pumpkin (below) home in July. He was really happy about our ’round courgette’! They’re green when they’re growing of course, hence the mix up, so it spent a few months ripening in a cupboard.

squash

There’s always something to do in the garden but at this time of year I find it particularly demanding. With the darker evenings it means there’s only really the weekends to get out there. Along with the clean up there’s also all the bulb planting… and my winter containers…. and window boxes to finish. It’s very exciting but this year it’s also very difficult!

What have you been doing in your garden over the last few weeks? Do you find there’s a lot to do in the garden at this time of year?

Growing a special bean in time for Christmas

harlow-carr-christmas-greenhouseA greenhouse at RHS Harlow Carr last December

After keeping this on the down low for months I’m very excited to reveal that Adam and I have our very own little bean growing, due in December!

It’s one of the reasons I’ve been blogging less over the last few months, I was literally too tired to read blogs and even muster up a blog post to begin with. Then, like the garden, I started ‘blooming’ but now I’m just exhausted all over again!

I’ve encountered another slight problem too – gardening when pregnant…

broad bean

Before I knew I was pregnant I was in amongst the weeds, digging and planting and not thinking anything of it. When I found out, someone told me about Toxoplasmosis and suggested that my gardening days were over until next year. No chance!!

We do see a lot of cats at the allotment so I’ve been very careful. I make sure I always wear gloves and wash my hands thoroughly afterwards. I’ve also avoided picking and eating fruit whilst pottering. Now I take it home for a wash first.

I’ve been spending time in the greenhouse on seed sowing and potting on duties, container gardening, some light weeding and cutting flowers. This is a big change for us as I normally do my fair share of that plus the digging and veg planting while Adam builds things. This year he’s had to do pretty much everything apart from pick flowers and light weeding! No wonder he’s still not finished the shed!

gardening pregnantHere I am late spring/early summer, trying to look energetic. My bump has grown considerably since then!

Gardening is something I couldn’t give up easily and has really kept me going through the nausea and tiredness. The garden has been a wonderful place to relax and switch off but it’s also allowed me to stretch my legs and get some all important fresh air.

I’m having to be far more organised this year because of the little bean. There can be no last minute bulb planting or late night gardening in November! I’ve chosen my winter garden plants already and I do hope that we have some nice Autumn weather so I can still spend time out there pottering – keeping active is very good for pregnancy.

harlow-carr-christmas-1Natural Christmas decoration ideas from Harlow Carr last year

Since our baby is due in December, hopefully in time for Christmas (if he or she is late the birth could be on Christmas Day), I’ve entered this blog post into a competition on Dotcomgiftshop to help everyone get into the Christmas mood. I have to admit that I don’t usually think about Christmas this early but this year I really have to. It just won’t be possible for me to do my usual last minute stint round the shops on Christmas Eve!

I’ve been eyeing up a few presents for people on the internet and I’ve also gone ‘nesting’ crazy and can’t wait to decorate my house to make it all homely and cosy while I’m waiting for the bean to arrive. I also fancy decorating my garden too, just like they do at Harlow Carr! Cute twinkling lights and lanterns have never been more appealing. These are some of my favourite Christmas ideas for gifts and decorations on the Dotcomgiftshop website.

dotcomgiftshop-christmas-gifts-decorations

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

The competition prize is an iPad Mini and I do hope I get everyone in the mood for Christmas because I’d simply LOVE one of those! I have a laptop and iPad from work that I use now but in a few weeks time when I start maternity leave I have to hand it all back – how will I cope! So an iPad Mini is No 1 on my Christmas list because it will be the perfect size and so handy for me to keep in touch with my favourite blogs, order my baby supplies and google like crazy when I have no idea what I’m meant to be doing with the new bean! I suspect I’ll also be reading a lot more blogs about gardening with kids too.

harlow-carr-christmas-2

I can’t wait to have a little one to share the garden with :)

harlow-carr-christmas-3

Have you organised your winter planting schemes already? Do you prepare early or are you a last minute gardener and shopper?! Are you in the mood for Christmas?

 

An apple a day…

an-apple-a-day

I love growing apples and have mentioned my inherited apple tree before. I’ve grown some perfect ‘Pink Lady’ apples this year and I love the sweet taste. There’s nothing like your own home grown apples and I’ve never tasted any as good as these from the shops.

apple-elderberry

Apple and Elderberry make a good combination, especially when stewed.

One thing I’ve never been able to do though is use them up very effectively. I find my picked apples go mouldy and my unpicked apples get eaten by pests or by people other than me.

Not pointing any fingers but in the past I’ve been relaxing under my apple tree only to find allotment neighbours sneak up and pinch them without realising I’m there! Now I love sharing and have given tons away, so there’s no need for that is there!

apple-tray

I’ve not had any stolen that I know about lately though and with the trees growing so big over the last few years sharing and thinking of ways to use them up has been top of my list. I’ve taken boxes full of them to friends and family. My apple tray from dotcomgiftshop is the ideal size for transporting them, it’s been really useful.

apples_bruised

A few weeks ago I bought a juicer and I’m over the moon with it. I used the damaged apples first (like the ones above), putting the perfect ones into storage. I can get through around 8 apples at a time for a couple of big drinks, so it’s really been the easiest and best use of my apples ever.

I just chop the apples into quarters, remove any bad bits and pop them straight into the juicer. Simple plain apple juice is amazing and mixed with blueberry and ginger is fantastic.

I’ve found that keeping the apples in the fridge makes a really nice cool juice.

stored_apples

With the absolutely perfect apples I washed them and individually wrapped them in newspaper and popped them into my cellar. I made sure they were totally perfect, not one blemish…but they’ve still gone to mush?!

At the weekend I watched Monty Don on Gardener’s World demonstrate how he saves his perfect apples on slatted shelves in a barn. He said it’s important for them not to touch each other and they can be kept anywhere dark but not too dry. So my technique should have been okay and I’ve read a lot of blogs and websites who recommend wrapping in newspaper – but alas no – it’s just not worked out for me again.

Next year the perfect ones are being eaten first and by me!

apple-trees-end-of-september

My apple tree is looking very bare now. Adam keeps mushing up the really damaged windfalls in a big bucket and he spreads them back on the ground as mulch.

My tree is an early producer so it’s not over yet for everyone, there’s still a lot of blog posts about apples that are ripening now and there’s lots of apple events happening throughout October.

Here’s some of my favourite apple posts for your weekend reading:

Veg Plotting – Take one bag of windfalls

The Garden Smallholder – Pecking Apples and Our Very Own Orchard

Potager Pottering and Crime – Apple Picking Time

Greentapestry – ‘What Katy Did’ And Other Stories

Please feel free to add any other posts to the comments.

pears

So now my only question now is…what to do with the pears!

Do you grow apples and have you ever successfully stored them? If yes HOW do you do it?!

Setting the scene for the autumn garden

 pumpkin-patch

This weekend felt like summer again, it was sunny and warm and as well as starting my big autumn garden clean up I also enjoyed spending time outside relaxing, tending to the last of the harvest and noticing the changing shapes and shades of autumn.

At this time of year some plants really come into their own and some just seem to battle on regardless. The sky is grey today so it’s these stars of autumn that provide the warmth and colour and help me to remember the good weekend I’ve had rather than focusing on any impeding gloom of winter.

I’m hoping for a sunny October, the reality might not be so good but I still enjoy the plants that continue to thrive despite the changes in the weather.

echinops

The echinops are going to seed now and I’ve stopped dead heading them but the ones still battling on attract the bees and it’s lovely to see them buzzing around and even sleeping on the flowers.

echinop-bee

sweet-peas

Also battling on are my absolute summer favourites – the sweet peas. I’m still cutting them and they continue to come back. Their stems are a little unruly but I love that!

persicaria-in-border

The persicaria provides great ground cover and colour from spring. It looks as good now as the day it came into bloom. The only problem I have are the weeds that grow amongst it, but hey, there’s always going to be weeds and it’s quite therapeutic getting down to ground level and weeding them out. Although, I did save that for another day ;)

rudbeckia

This rudbeckia is a real suprise. We salvaged some last year that were meant to be the annual rudbeckia cappuccino, so when this started to grow in the summer we were a little confused! It’s either a different variety, a perennial that snuck in somehow or it’s very confused too! Either way I love it and despite all my struggles with rudbeckias in the past, this one (although looking somewhat tatty now) is still a real star.

semperivivum

I just love houseleeks and a simple pot provides a lot of interest and a fresh green colour to the garden.

crocosmia

Crocosmia is often regarded as ‘common’ but I love the vibrant colour and the way that the flowers really stand out against the foliage at this time of year.

succulents

What fantastic plants sedums are, they attract wildlife and definitely come into their own in autumn. The plant above is providing good cover and colour in my long border.

The pot below was started as a small cutting just two months ago and its growth rate has been amazing.

succulent-pot

hosta-damage

Hostas provide amazing foliage but as you can see, it’s a shame when they get eaten. They will die down completely over winter but for now, despite being chomped on, they’re battling on!

I’ve got 4 hostas and I confess I’ve neglected all of them. I need to consider this for next year. I think they look great in huge pots and I might relocate them to help protect them from damage next year. I could also divide some of the hostas now, maybe leaving a bit in the borders and moving some on into pots. I’m still pondering!

cuphea-cyanea

A few posts back I mentioned my little evergreen cuphea, above is cuphea cyanea a totally different looking plant altogether. My cousin bought me this when we visited Sissinghurst in June and it’s been amazing, growing and growing and still flowering. Apparently it’s only half hardy though so you can be sure I’ll be looking after it in the greenhouse over winter. Its acidic summer colours brighten any grey day and on sunny days it really shines.

sissinghurst-climber

Another plant my cousin bought me from Sissinghurst is this rhodochiton or purple bell vine. Another half hardy perennial that I’ll be taking great caution with over winter. It’s still flowering intensely now and along with the cuphea cyanea it’s definitely a special kind of plant.

lavender

lavender-october

One of my lavender varieties is still flowering, you can see it’s coming near to the end but this one lasts so much longer than the others. It still gets covered in bees and has the most beautiful colour and fragrance. I just wish I knew which variety it was.

ivy-pelargonium

At the front of my house, the rose and the window boxes of pelargoniums are still flowering profusely and looking very healthy. So I have time to plan my container garden collection for the winter.

heather-heuchera

In preparation for winter I’ve stuck with the pink and purple themes that I picked up in Provence and I’m thinking about lots of heucheras and heathers. I’m going to go for foliage this winter as I think there’s a lot to be said for interesting leaf shapes, shades and textures. Lots more shopping to be done!

teasle

How’s your garden looking and are you enjoying the changing shapes and shades of the autumn plants? Will you be making any changes in your garden for the rest of autumn and winter?

 

Summer favourites – sweet peas

sweet-pea-garden

I have to admit that I’ve never picked sweet peas for the house before and I’ve only been growing them for a couple of years. I used to think the sweet candy coloured varieties that were popular years ago were sickly and a little kitsch but after buying a willow planter full of them two years back, I’ve changed my mind! So much so, I even started sowing the seeds for this summer back in November.

sweet-pea-close-up

My experiments with sweet peas:

A) November: Sowed a batch indoors, they germinated quickly and survived the whole winter on a windowsill. In the new year they went soft and leggy. Potted them on in February and moved them to the cold greenhouse, heating it at night. Mixed them into the willow planter with my next batch (experiment ‘B’ below) and I’m not entirely sure what happened to them?!

B) November: Sowed a batch straight into my willow planter inside the (very) cold greenhouse. Waited… At the end of January they started to come through, it took until March for them to look established but they were far tougher than the floppy things that had been inside the house. They flourished and flowered in May and they continued to flower until July when we went on holiday and they didn’t get watered. Being in a planter, with room for only shallow roots, the basket quickly dried out in the heatwave and expired.

C) April: Sowed tons of sweet peas in pots in the greenhouse. A very slow start and I vowed never to sow them again as they also grew leggy and soft. Planted them out not expecting too much….. boom! They grew and grew and are still growing. They’re very healthy plants and gorgeous colours.

Conclusion: I’ll sow again in November but I wont bother bringing them on early in the house. I’ll just leave them to their own devices in the cold greenhouse (B) because that did produce a very healthy crop in spring. I’ll also sow again in April (C),  the more the merrier in my opinion and I’ll get them outside a lot quicker to avoid them going soft and leggy, even though they recovered well once I’d planted them out. I’ll avoid the planter next year too because sweet peas do put down long roots if allowed and will spread and grow a lot bigger if they are planted into the ground.

collecting-sweet-peas

I do believe the continued success of the sweet peas has been my cutting. I’ve been cutting all the flowers off and by about 4 days later they are back and ready to cut again.

cut-sweet-peas

They attract a lot of greenflies, so I give my picked bunches a good shake. This seems to knock most of them off quite easily.

growing-sweet-peas

cutting-sweet-peas

I just love having freshly cut sweet peas in the house and I also just love cutting bunches. It’s such a nice, quiet and relaxing job to do in the garden and walking home with my bag full of flowers or a bunch in my hand feels wonderful!

sweet-pea-vase

sweet-peas

Do you grow sweet peas? Do you enjoy the ‘cut and comeback’ flowers they produce? When do you sow or plant yours out?

The late summer harvest – growing apples and pears

apple-tree

I love growing apples and pears and I’m so lucky to have two mature trees in my allotment garden. They were both planted around 4 years before I took over the plot and I’ve been there around 10 years myself now.

Each year the quantity and quality of the harvest is different and depending upon what I’m doing around harvest time, how I store them and what I do with them also differs. For example, in previous years I’ve been away on holiday around this time only to return to find the trees stripped bare. Some years all the fruit falls off so quickly I’m left with hardly anything and some years we pick it all and then it ‘goes off’. So, basically we either have too much fruit, or we don’t have enough and vow to make the most of it the following year.

pears-growingBaby pears last month, I love the way they grow up in the air!

Pears seem to be a lot easier to store, they last longer and they get eaten by Adam very quickly so it’s just apples that I need to work on.

We’ve undertaken various tasks to over the years to make the most of our harvest. We’ve subjected ourselves to mammoth picking sessions just before we go on holiday, but often only to return to mouldy fruit. Adam also made an ingenious ‘apple catcher’ a couple of years ago but of course the majority of the apples that fall off (windfalls as they call them round here) are usually damaged so there’s not much point in that either.

One year we bought a fruit press and made cider. Never again! It was a lot of effort, a lot of apples and not much cider. It took us hours and all the juice squirted through the muslin and wooden slats splatting everything in sight! There was definitely some comedy value in what we did but not much else.

Then other years things go very well and we have just enough fresh apples and pears and no hassle! Those years are the ones where the harvest isn’t too overwhelming. This year, thanks to the amazing blossom in spring we have more apples and pears than I’ve ever seen before and I’m definitely overwhelmed!

apple-tree-blossomFruit blossom in spring

This year I want to do something different and I need ideas! I’m very lucky that dotcomgiftshop asked if I would like to review a product and knowing that I have this big apple and pear harvest to contend with I chose their vintage style apple produce tray. I promised them a review in exchange for the tray so I’ll have to come back to that later when it’s really been put to the test! I’m really impressed with it so far though. It looks great and it’s a lot bigger than I thought it would be. It’s also got really nice smooth surfaces and I like that because I can keep it clean more easily than a rough finished tray and avoid dragging dirt into the kitchen.

dotcomgiftshop-vintage-tray

I’ll be able to get two stacks of apples in my tray separated with brown paper. Then I can store them, I’m just not sure where to store them this time, in the light or in the dark? I’ve tried both in the past but still end up with a few mouldy apples.

In terms of eating my harvest this year, I also have elderberries in my garden and I’ve seen a gorgeous recipe for stewed apple and elderberry pancakes in my new Nigel Slater book! Adam bought me his Kitchen Diaries II book for my birthday and it’s full of seasonal recipes using up everything he grows in his garden. So, apart from stewed apple and just eating apples as they are, what else can I do this year? I fancy getting a juicer (I’m never using the fruit press again!) but I have no idea which one to buy and how much use I’d get from it…decisions, decisions!

Do you harvest apples and pears? How do you store them? Do you freeze them, juice them and do you have any recipes? All ideas welcome!

 

Welcome to the jungle – the garden has taken off!

allotment-courgettes-july

Since my last post from the garden in late June/early July things have developed drastically! While I’ve been away on holiday the plants have grown, or should I say over-grown in the remarkable British weather!

allotment-july

Adam was a little worried that the sprinkler system he set up would not work…but it did.

We returned to an abundance of foliage, crops and what I can only describe as a jungle in the pumpkin patch!

tomatoes-growing-in-greenhouse

greenhouse-july

We have lots of crops to harvest and a great big yellow courgette! The first of many.

allotment-harvest

apples-and-pears

broad-bean-harvest
brocolli-july
desert-gooseberries
grapes
green-tomato
peas-and-gooseberries-harvest
redcurrants

The higgledy-piggledy wildlife border is a bit of a mess now the foxgloves have died off. Looking forward to the teasel and echinops coming out though and the persicaria is still looking good.

I’ve got some late summer planting ideas for this border and can’t wait to get started.

persecaria

pink-dahlia

Unfortunately we didn’t have a sprinkler system for the front garden but we took all the containers, including window boxes up the road to the allotment so they would be watered. My pots of dahlias have come out while we were away and look great.

Out front the clematis has suffered, so has the rose and the rosemary plant actually died. Wow it must have been hot!

The day lilies are amazing though and have really spread since last year so they’re providing some lovely colour.

Day-lilies

I’m full of inspiration from our holiday in Provence and decided to take the opportunity to have a bit of an overhaul at the front anyway for my late summer display, by moving some containers around and buying some new plants – there’s nothing like a bit of retail therapy!

flowers-front-garden

How are your gardens doing? Do you have a good harvest this year? Do you have any tips for keeping your gardens in shape while you’re away on holiday?

 

Down at the allotments – what’s growing on!

allotmentA few weeks back the pumpkins and courgettes were still tiny..

I’m really enjoying myself at the allotment lately. I’m finding it a wonderful place to put my feet up and relax and I also love potting on in the greenhouse and watching the crops grow.

courgetteThe pumpkin patch growing a little more

Last year was also very enjoyable but because we had so much wet weather followed by lots of dry weather the harvest was quite mixed. I had amazing tomatoes, chilies and peppers but a severe lack of pumpkin, squash, courgette, beetroot, peas and potatoes. I suspect those crops didn’t enjoy the grey sky and rain.

allotment-courgettesNow the pumpkin patch is taking over!

This year I’m hoping for an all-round better performance from my edible plants and so far things are looking good (apart from the mess caused by ‘shed’ making!)

We are currently on holiday in Provence and I hear that there is a heatwave at home. Adam set up an ingenious timer controlled watering system and ‘allotment Bill’ has offered to help out too, but if this is what my crops were like before we left then I imagine (and hope) we will go back to a full-on harvest festival!

Here’s what was happening before we left…

tomatoes-growing

pears-growing

gooseberries

curly-kale

broad-beans-and-strawberries

lettuce

peas

The pea plants are so short and sparse this year but they cropped a long time before anyone elses at the allotments. I think this is because I sowed them earlier in guttering in the greenhouse.

broad beans

My broad beans have been cropping for many weeks now too, maybe because I sowed them back in November. The ones I sowed direct in March had caught up in size before we left but not with the beans.

peppers-growing

potatoes

redcurrant

I’m looking forward to these little cucumbers growing a bit more!

cucumber

I can’t say that I’m 100% looking forward to going home because our holiday in Provence is wonderful but I am looking forward to doing some gardening and seeing how much our plants have grown.

How are your crops getting on? Are you finding them better this year compared to last?

 

A surprise lily and not so surprising lily beetle

lily

I was pottering around the potatoes and to my surprise I found a pot of lilies!

I don’t know how this got put with all my spring bulb pots, which are ready to be stored away and refreshed in the autumn.

old plant pots

I salvaged it immediately but to my horror I also found the dreaded lily beetle.

I don’t like killing wildlife of any sort but these are an invasive species in the UK, which makes ‘disposing of them’ a little easier to cope with. The RHS have a good page all about the lily beetle if you want to know more about its origin and distribution in the UK.

We only started to find these in the allotment last year and for such a lovely looking little pest they do a lot of damage.

lily beetle

When Adam tore down our old shed he found a lot of them and gathered them into a little pot. He was very eager to make me listen to them. I wasn’t impressed by this but they did make a very loud squeak!

I have other lilies growing elsewhere in the garden. Lovely yellow day lilies in the front garden and a few dotted around the allotment.

foxglovesA few lilies are planted in the higgledy-piggledy wildlife garden. Hope they don’t attract the ‘wrong’ wildlife though!

.peach lily

How has your garden been for pests this year? What’s your worst pest? Have you seen any of the giant Spanish slugs yet?!

 

Published from the plot! Taking time out in the garden

greenhouse

I started my blog for many reasons, one being a reminder to switch off from work and concentrate on the things I enjoy in my life.

Gardening helps me to achieve a healthy work-life balance and it hasn’t been a problem lately. In fact I’ve been outside so much that my blogging balance has taken a serious hit! I also work for a much better company now and I’m not subjected to 24/7 corporate bashing anymore and I find it far easier to leave work behind.

Talking of which, this week I do feel in need of a rest, I want a break! So I’ve taken myself off to the plot with Molly (my newish dog) to do some serious chilling out.

greenhouse
Can you see Molly sniffing around under the turkish bed?

Adam’s been building a new shed (wait till you see this ‘shed’ – it’s more of a summer house/chalet!) so there’s bits and bobs of rubble all over the place waiting to be re-homed.

I’ve done some pottering and I’ve also been chatting to my fellow ‘allotmenteers’ Norman and Bill. Oh to be retired and do this every day!

allotment messI’m still waiting for my strawberries to turn red in amongst all the rubble.

I’ve also been sitting in the sunshine with my feet up, watching all the bees doing their work in my  higgledy-piggledy wildlife border.

wildlife garden

gooseberriesMy wildlife border started out as my fruit border but now we mix the soft fruits in with perennials and annuals, or in the case of the foxgloves – biennials.

I’ve lost count watching the bumblebees buzzing in and out of the foxgloves.

foxgloves

I loved sitting and chilling but as usual the British weather has brought the clouds, so I’ve decided to catch up with my blog.

In my last garden update I said I was having trouble finding time to blog and joked about an internet connection in the greenhouse! Well, today I’ve actually made that happen.

I’ve plugged my iPhone into my laptop and turned on its wireless hotspot. I’ve  successfully uploaded my photos and typed up this blog post on-line from the new shed! Let’s see what happens when I click publish…

new shed being builtA quick glimpse of the new ‘shed’. We still need to paint it and Adam wants to do something amazing with the roof! Watch this space!

I could really get used to this lifestyle! If only the ‘shed’ was my full time home office.

Have you ever thought about working from the garden? Do you find time to chill out and enjoy your outdoor space?

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